Young seeks Hoosier support for “Pay for Results Act”

By Shelby Mullis
TheStatehouseFile.com

INDIANAPOLIS — Republican U.S. Rep. Todd Young met with Goodwill Industries of Central Indiana executives Tuesday to promote a bill he said will save taxpayer money and deliver aid to America’s most vulnerable citizens.

The Social Impact Partnerships to Pay for Results Act, passed by the U.S. House of Representatives in June, would refrain from the use of government funds, only requiring private investors to pay for the programs that prove useful.

Members of the Nurse-Family Partnership met with Rep. Todd Young and the media Tuesday afternoon to discuss social welfare programs. Guide consultant Liv Norby-Sedam (left), nurse home visiter Courtnie Leeper (middle), and Plainfield Goodwill employee Sedona Couch (right) where in attendance to share more information about the program.  Megan Powell, TheStatehouseFile.com

Members of the Nurse-Family Partnership met with Rep. Todd Young and the media Tuesday afternoon to discuss social welfare programs. Guide consultant Liv Norby-Sedam (left), nurse home visiter Courtnie Leeper (middle), and Plainfield Goodwill employee Sedona Couch (right) where in attendance to share more information about the program.
Megan Powell, TheStatehouseFile.com

A Social Impact Partnership, as explained by Young’s campaign, is a “public-private partnership in which philanthropic investors fund a program aimed at improving a specific social outcome.”

If passed, the bill would allow for investors to financially support various programs of their choice. If there is no positive outcome reached, the investor is paid nothing by the federal government, but if the program does achieve measurable success, the investor is paid their initial investment plus an additional profit.

“Let me be clear: this is the new way to serve our poor, our vulnerable, our more at-risk citizens,” Young said. “Rather than measure our compassion by how much or how little we spend, social impact partnerships reward what works based on actual evidence. By adopting this bipartisan outcomes-based approach, we help more Americans overcome the root causes of poverty while guaranteeing taxpayers only pay for real results.”

One Indiana example of the programs benefited by Young’s bill is the Nurse-Family Partnership, run by Goodwill Industries of Central Indiana.

Indiana’s Nurse-Family Partnerships, launched in 2011 by Goodwill, focuses its attention on assisting first-time, low-income mothers by pairing them with a nurse for home visits throughout the early stages of pregnancy and motherhood.

Rep. Todd Young met with the media Tuesday afternoon. The congressman addressed how he felt about his new democratic opponent, Evan Bayh. Megan Powell TheStatehouseFile.com

Rep. Todd Young met with the media Tuesday afternoon. The congressman addressed how he felt about his new democratic opponent, Evan Bayh.
Megan Powell TheStatehouseFile.com

To enroll in the program, an expecting mother must be in her first pregnancy and be less than seven months into her pregnancy, be at 200 percent or more below the poverty level and be a resident of one of six of the counties where services are currently offered — Delaware, Lake, Madison, Marion, Tippecanoe and White.

The program is currently at the capacity to serve between 1,100 and 1,200 Hoosier families, according to Betsy Delgado, the Goodwill Industries of Central Indiana vice president.

Goodwill Industries of Central Indiana CEO Kent Kramer said the company is very excited about the legislation because it provides the essential support programs like the Nurse-Family Partnership need.

“In this demographic, there are 14,000 first-time Medicaid births in the state every year,” Kramer said. “The model shows you can really start to have long-term results and a deeper impact if you can serve up to about 6,000. That tipping point is if you can get up to 6,000 where you start having generational success, so that’s where we’d like to be. It’s all about funding, that’s why we’re so excited about the Pay for Results Act and support the congressman and will be communicating with the Senate as well to get their support.”

Young agreed, adding that it’s social impact partnerships like Nurse-Family Partnerships that will benefit most from the Pay for Results Act, which is why he hopes the bill will be signed into law within the coming months.

“With respect to this specific population, these specific services that Goodwill of Central Indiana are offering through the Nurse-Family Partnership, this is the new way to serve the next generation of Hoosiers,” Young said. “To serve mothers who need a helping hand. To serve families across the state of Indiana. The old way is the one-size-fits-all way — throwing money at a problem.”

Shelby Mullis is a reporter for TheStatehouseFile.com, a news website powered by Franklin College journalism students.

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