Man fights all the way to US Supreme Court to protect his marriage

By Braden Pelley
TheStatehouseFile.com

INDIANAPOLIS — A man at the center of a U.S. Supreme Court case about marriage equality spoke Friday in Indianapolis, saying he is honoring his late husband with his fight to legalize their union.

Jim Obergefell, the Ohio plaintiff in a case that could determine whether gay marriage is legal across the United States, says he's just trying to honor his late husband and marriage. Photo by Braden Pelley, TheStatehouseFile.com

Jim Obergefell, the Ohio plaintiff in a case that could determine whether gay marriage is legal across the United States, says he’s just trying to honor his late husband and marriage. Photo by Braden Pelley, TheStatehouseFile.com

“When my husband John died, I never thought I would have to fight all the way to the U.S. Supreme court to defend our marriage,” said Jim Obergefell, the plaintiff in a case that could determine whether gay marriage is legal across the United States.

Obergefell is on a multi-city tour talking about the case, which is expected to be decided sometime this summer. His visit to the Indiana Statehouse was hosted by the Human Rights Campaign.

Obergefell married his partner John Arthur in 2013 in Maryland, where same-sex marriage was legal. Arthur was terminally ill. Upon returning home to Ohio, where same-sex marriage was banned, the couple sought to have Obergefell named as a surviving spouse on the death certificate.

The result was a case that has made its way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

But Obergefell said that either way the case is decided, marriage equality will likely be a never-ending battle for people in the lesbian, gay, bipartisan and transgender community.

That’s why he’s taking his story across the country, with stops in several cities including St. Louis, Phoenix, San Francisco and Charlotte, North Carolina.

“There isn’t a better way to honor my late husband,” Obergefell said, “than to stand here in front of you, and tell our story.”

Braden Pelley is a reporter for TheStatehouseFile.com, a news website powered by Franklin College journalism students.

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