Lawmakers brainstorm teacher mentorship ideas

By Andi TenBarge
TheStatehouseFile.com

INDIANAPOLIS — A Senate committee is considering combining two bills creating mentorship programs for new teachers.

The Career Pathways and Mentorship Program, proposed under House Bill 1005, would provide experienced educators with extra pay in exchange for mentoring new teachers. The goal is to help new teachers “set a greater foundation for them to learn and ultimately be more effective in the classroom,” according to the bill’s author Rep. Dale DeVon, R-Granger.

John Barnes, director of legislative affairs for Indiana Department of Education, discusses teacher mentorship. By Max Bomber TheStatehouseFile.com.

John Barnes, director of legislative affairs for Indiana Department of Education, discusses teacher mentorship. By Max Bomber TheStatehouseFile.com.

John Barnes with the Indiana Department of Education urged lawmakers Wednesday to blend in remnants of Rep. Randy Truitt’s, R-Lafayette, bill into HB 1005. Truitt’s proposal outlined a plan to recruit and retain teachers program along with a teacher mentoring program. That bill died after not getting a hearing in the House Ways and Means Committee.

“I have spoken to Rep. DeVon about the idea of trying to keep portions of Rep. Truitt’s bill into 1005 that way we can enhance it and have a bill that covers not just mentoring and career pathways, but also recruitment and retention,” Barnes said.

Barnes also said his department was concerned about an amendment made in the House that would require the DOE to consult with the State Board of Education to administer funds to pay mentors. He said the consultation process should be reversed because, “that is the traditional way in such things are run in terms of administration.”

The committee did not take a vote on HB 1005 Wednesday. Committee Chairman, Sen. Dennis Kruse, R-Auburn, said they would consider adding amendments to the bill and vote next week.

 Andi TenBarge is a reporter for TheStatehouseFile.com, a news site powered by Franklin College journalism students.

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